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September 13th, 2008

THE 8TH ANNUAL NEW YORK CITY INTERNATIONAL PICKLE DAY: 9/14/8.

by John Coakley

The Lower East Side (and the New York Food Museum) reminds the rest of the city that its immigrant history is not forgotten with the 8th Annual New York City International Pickle Day. And when they say international, they mean it; Asian pickles hold their own against their European and American cousins in this street fair that promises live music, presumably to ease digestion. No word if the famous Kool Aid pickle (pictured above) will be represented. But there’s only one way to find out, right?

Sunday, September 14th, 2008
Hours: 11-4:30
Rain or Shine!
Orchard Street between Grand and Broome in Manhattan’s old Pickle District

Filed Under: Arts & Leisure | Community | Events | New York

September 12th, 2008

“FOR A LANGUAGE TO COME: PROVOKING CHANGE IN JAPANESE POSTWAR PHOTOGRAPHY” EXHIBIT @ CAROLINA NITSCH

by Joelle Panisch

Carolina Nitsch’s latest exhibition presents a collection of 35 vintage-edition photobooks from the late 1950’s to the early 1990’s that document Japan’s postwar cultural movement. Showcased as a collection of photography books, the images feel historic and powerful as if roaming through a grandparent’s closet and finding details of the past.

These books, an epitome to Japan, ultimately demonstrate the effects and, eventually, social development of a nation that had to rise above the closest humanity has ever come to Armageddon. The collection illustrates the vital influence of such times on its radically evolving aesthetic and societal climate.

Photography books by Nobuyoshi Araki, Masahiso Fukase, Eikoh Hosoe, Yasuhiro Ishimoto, Kenji Kanesaka, Kikuji Kawada, Keizo Kitajima, Seiji Kurata, Daido Moriyama,Takuma Nakahira, Yutaka Takanashi, Shomei Tomatsu, Hiroshi Sugimoto and others

FOR A LANGUAGE TO COME : Provoking Change in Japanese Postwar Photography
September 12 – November 8, 2008

Carolina Nitsch Project Room
534 West 22nd Street
New York, New York 10011 USA
(212) 645 2030
Tue-Sat 11-6
info@carolinanitsch.com

Filed Under: Arts & Leisure | Events | New York

September 11th, 2008

THE GODFATHER, PARTS 1 + 2 @ FILM FORUM: 9/12/8—10/2/8.

by John Coakley

You already know that the first two Godfather films are masterpieces, epic tales of the dark side of what it sometimes takes to achieve the American Dream. You may have already seen them, but a) these are the kinds of films that can be seen more than once, especially on the big screen, and b) they have been beautifully restored by Paramount Pictures, overseen by Coppola himself and cinematographer Gordon Willis. Both movies underwent extensive frame-by-frame examination and restoration using state-of-the-art digital technology. So go to the San Gennaro Festival on Mulberry, get stuffed on the junk food of your choice, and then waddle over to the Film Forum to get a taste of real Italian-American culture.

Film Forum
209 W Houston St @ Varick
(212) 727-8110

WEEK ONE (SEPTEMBER 12 – 18): THE GODFATHER
1:00, 4:30, 8:00
WEEK TWO (SEPTEMBER 19 – 25): THE GODFATHER, PART II
1:00, 4:45, 8:35
WEEK THREE (SEPTEMBER 26 – OCTOBER 2):
THE GODFATHER
Fri/Sun/Tues 1:00, 8:20
Mon/Wed/Thurs/Sat 4:45
THE GODFATHER, PART II
Fri/Sun/Tues 4:30
Mon/Wed/Thurs/Sat 1:00, 8:35

Filed Under: Arts & Leisure | Events | New York

September 10th, 2008

RESIDENTS FEAR FOUL PLAY BY CROSBY STREET HOTEL DEVELOPERS

by Amelia Bronsworth

SoHo residents fear the wool is being pulled over their eyes after negotiations over liquor license stipulations with the Crosby Street Hotel failed to be signed by the Community Board Two’s State Liquor Authority Licensing Committee.

The Crosby Street Hotel, owned by UK based mega-developers the Firmdale Hotel Group, had a representative meet with the residents on September 3rd to discuss the concerns of the community. After compromising on conditions for the Method of Operation, residents agreed not to oppose Firmdale’s application to erect a lobby and restaurant on the ground floor of the building. To do so requires special permit pursuant to Section 74-781 of the Zoning Resolution, which is taken under consideration at the CB2 Zoning Committee meeting.

All of this was contingent on the stipulations made at the September 3rd meeting being signed at the CB2 SLA Licensing meeting on September 9th. However that meeting never happened. Continue Reading »

Filed Under: Articles | Community | New York | Politics

September 10th, 2008

BUCKMINSTER FULLER @ THE WHITNEY: THROUGH 9/21/8.

by John Coakley

It’s always fun to be told about cultural goings on just as they’re about to happen, but it’s just as important be reminded of those long runs before they run out. We here at the SoHo Journal completely understand the procrastinating tendency that we all struggle against—a problem that gets bigger when one is faced with as many choices as we are here in New York. Oh, that there were only more hours in the day, et cetera et cetera.

All of that to say, get your ass up to the Whitney before you miss your chance to see their comprehensive overview of the work of R. Buckminster Fuller, a scientist who practically invented interdisciplinarianism. Architecture? Check. Automotive Design? Check. Environmentalism? Check. Fuller was constantly trying to do more with less, decades before going green was a mainstream choice. Plus, he espoused the virtues of living in domes, which is right up there with flying cars at the top of the “Science Fiction That Should Have Become Science Fact But Didn’t” list. The exhibit ends September 21st, so go now.

Buckminster Fuller: Starting With the Universe
Whitney Museum of American Art
945 Madison Ave @ 75th St
212-570-3676
Through 9/21/8

Filed Under: Arts & Leisure | Community | Events | New York

September 9th, 2008

JULIANA HATFIELD @ VIRGIN MEGASTORE + BOWERY BALLROOM, 9/11/8 + 9/12/8

by John Coakley

Juliana Hatfield started out as the lead vocalist/bassist and principal songwriter for the Blake Babies, one of the finest bands to come out of the late 80’s/early 90’s Boston scene. But the quality of the songs was often overshadowed by her kinda-sorta-we’re-just-friends-except-when-we’re-not romance with Evan Dando of the Lemonheads. More influenced by Big Star and XTC than Kate Bush or Stevie Nicks, her catchy as all hell songs were too rough for the Lilith Fair crowd of the late 90’s. And now her voice would be considered too imperfect for radio play, which is a shame because we could use more interesting voices—both literally and figuratively—on the airwaves.

Those unfamiliar with Juliana’s work have a foolproof way to check it out. First, go to Virgin on Thursday for a signing and free performance. Then, if you liked what she was doing, buy a ticket to see her at the Bowery Ballroom on Friday. Can’t lose. You should go.

Juliana Hatfield

Virgin Megastore Union Square
52 E 14th St
9/11/8 @ 7pm

Bowery Ballroom
6 Delancey St
w/ Hayden
9/12/8 @ 9pm

Filed Under: Arts & Leisure | Events | New York

September 8th, 2008

CALLING: AN OPERA OF FORGIVENESS @ LA MAMA: 9/12/8—9/28/8.

by John Coakley

Calling: An Opera of Forgiveness is based on Wickham Boyle‘s 2002 book A Mother’s Essays from Ground Zero, with music by Douglas Geers. It tells the story of a downtown family on 9/11, and the month immediately following it. Drama, music, choreography and a soaring architectural set combine to portray the family’s efforts to move from shock to some sense of hope. Parts of this work had been presented at the Cornelia St. Cafe’s Serial Underground in New York City from June 2007 through March 2008; this will be the first full production. Worth a look.

La Mama ETC First Floor Theater
74A E. 4th Street
Performances run September 12—14, 18—21, and 26—28.
Performances at 8pm except Sundays 2:30pm and 8pm.
Tickets $25. Students/Seniors $20.
Box office: 212-475-7710 or click here.

Filed Under: Arts & Leisure | Community | Events | New York

September 7th, 2008

PURE GOLD: PIT BULL, NO. BARRACUDA, YES.

by Ed Gold


Watch out, Governor Palin! That King Crab is about to attack!

A smiling Ms. Barracuda dazzled her colleagues in the Twin Cities, a GOP party now slightly to the right of Attila the Hun, tossing them raw Democratic meat just as she shoots down polar bears in Alaska from a helicopter, even though the EPA calls them an endangered species.

She preached reform and change based on her performance as mayor of a town of 7000 and governor of a state with much fewer people than Manhattan, a state where her success has been rooted in Federal government earmarks and a policy of drill, drill everywhere for oil.

She won the hearts of one of the great American parties—which has now become an anachronism—at a convention in which 68 percent of the delegates were men and 93 percent were Caucasians. They cheered when she ridiculed Obama’s goal of “turning back the waters and healing the planet,” her dismissal of global warming. Continue Reading »

Filed Under: Articles | Commentary | New York | Politics

September 6th, 2008

LANCE HORNE @ ARS NOVA: 9/9/8 @ 9PM.

by John Coakley

Uncharted is Ars Nova‘s showcase for promising young singer-songwriters. This time the multi-talented Lance Horne presents nine songs written especially for this show. Composed over the last nine nights of the Perseid meteor shower, these lyric-driven, piano infused compositions are equal parts sexy and sly. For one night only, Horne will be joined by all-star musicians Yair Evnine, Josh Giunta, Jessica Hershberg, Nick Wincenc and special guests Lea DeLaria and Alice Ripley.

Lance Horne
9/9/8 @ 9pm
$15
Ars Nova
511 West 54th Street
(between 10th and 11th Avenues)
Get tickets here.

Filed Under: New York

September 5th, 2008

THE BIG DRAW @ NATIONAL MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN INDIAN: 9/6/8. PLUS: ART PARADE CANCELLED

by John Coakley


Why the long face? No Art Parade, that’s why.

Start your day flexing your artistic muscles with The Big Draw, an event sponsored by The Drawing Center that’s happening at six different locations all over the city. Of particular note is the chance to draw Native American dancers from various tribes as they perform traditional dances.

Then after all that work creating art, head to the fourth annual Deitch Art Parade and be entertained by it. Or rather, that’s what we would have recommended. Unfortunately, the impending rainstorm has put the kabosh on the one day of the year when the artists and freaks of our city take SoHo back from the boutiques. So use your imagination and create your own surrealist commentary on consumerism’s debilitating effect on creative expression (try using household items like dried beans, paper plates, and glue) and parade down the hallway with your neighbors. Life’s giving us lemons, so let’s paint that shit gold, kids.

The Big Draw
9/6/8, 11am – 4pm
National Museum of the American Indian – Pavilion
One Bowling Green in Manhattan

Deitch Art Parade 2008
CANCELLED

Filed Under: Arts & Leisure | Events | New York

September 5th, 2008

THE NEW YORK HISTORICAL SOCIETY PRESENTS VICTOR PREVOST: EARLY PHOTOGRAPHS OF NEW YORK.

by Joelle Panisch

The New York Historical Society Library not only teaches but dazzles with their latest exhibition, which showcases the photographs of 19th century photographer (1820-1881) Victor Prevost. His rare works survived to showcase a now unfamiliar Manhattan. Beginning in 1853 using the calotype process (learned from French photographer Gustave Le Gray), Prevost was able to capture the budding city and an architectural era that we only have glimpses of today.

Prevost’s studio was close to home, at 627 Broadway between Houston and Bleecker. The collection includes views of sites in downtown Manhattan around Battery Place, Lower Broadway and pictures of the sculptures at the Crystal Exhibition building. The exhibition includes 35 images as well as several wax negatives rotated in.

Victor Prevost: Early Photographs of New York
September 5, 2008–October 19, 2008
New York Historical Society
170 Central Park West (at 77th street)
(212) 485-9293
Admission: Members Free; Adults $10; Seniors (65+) & Educators $7; Students $6; Children Under 12 Free

Filed Under: Arts & Leisure | Community | Events | New York

September 3rd, 2008

SOHO PROFILES: POLITICOS ON THE MOVE!

by D. Clark MacPherson

Carlos Manzano: LMEC Executive Director

No, he’s not running. He ran—and won. So did we.

This is an update on one of Bloomberg’s smart appointments.

Carlos Manzano, a very politically active Latino leader, has been head of New York City’s Latin Media and Entertainment Commission for nearly two years. Its purpose is to attract high profile events and broaden the cultural base of our city—to develop business strategies that develop Latin culture and media.

Under Manzano’s direction New York City has moved further in the direction of becoming the center of Latin media and entertainment.

With an estimated “$700 billion in buying power” which Manzano expects to reach $1 Trillion within two years, there is a significant market to tap.

In his statement about the LMEC, Manzano writes: Continue Reading »

Filed Under: Articles | Community | New York | Politics

September 3rd, 2008

SOHO JOURNAL GALLERY

by SoHo Journal Staff

We are committed to introducing new talents, as well as showcasing established artists and photographers in each issue. We also strive to bring our readers new, powerful and important trends in the art world. Please contact us if you or someone you know is breaking barriers, or creating a movement. Fame is not a prerequisite––talent is.

JOHN SILVER
Mr. Silver has been painting cityscapes since 1975. In the beginning, he would paint in the solitude of his studio, almost always off his imagination and strictly for his own consumption. When he lost his space with the rise of real estate prices, the outdoors became his studio, and as he physically initiated a communication with the outside world, so did his art. John’s work can be seen in several galleries around the world. His latest show was at The Westbeth Gallery, 57 Bethune St. @ Washington St. To contact him please click here.


Tortilla Flats, Oil on Linen 20×24” Continue Reading »

Filed Under: Articles | Arts & Leisure | Community | New York

September 3rd, 2008

REVIEWS, PART 2.

by John Coakley

A Tribute to Edith Piaf:
Live at Montreux, 2004
DVD 79 minutes
Eagle Eye Media

Pianist Baptiste Trotignon led his dexterous band through this tribute to Edith Piaf, perhaps France’s most beloved entertainer. His band supported six different singers who took a stab at the songs Piaf, who had perfect pitch and a power matched only be her vocal control, made famous. No easy task. It’s hard for a singer covering a legend’s work to know whether to stay true to the original recording or stretch out and risk looking foolish in front of a huge crowd. This video shows the result of both choices. Continue Reading »

Filed Under: Articles | Arts & Leisure | New York

September 3rd, 2008

REVIEWS, PART 1.

by Mr. Norman Maine

The Stranger: 30th Anniversary
[Limited Edition]
(Deluxe Boxed Set – 2 CDs + 1 DVD)
[BOX SET] [EXTRA TRACKS] [ORIGINAL RECORDING REMASTERED]
Legacy Records

In 1977, Joel’s breakthrough album replaced Simon & Garfunkel’s Bridge Over Troubled Water as Columbia Records’ all time top-selling record (when they really still were records), establishing Joel as a true giant of adult contemporary—America’s answer to Elton John. The Stranger also launched Joel’s long-term collaboration with producer Phil Ramone, who distilled the Piano Man’s music to its essence: a hook-packed marriage of AM-radio pop and big splashy Broadway musical schmaltz. The first hit single was the gooey Just the Way You Are, but there’s a long and impressive variety of other hits here: deep, thinking ballads like Vienna, spot on, ethnic Long Islandish epics (Scenes From An Italian Restaurant), pop’s greatest homage to deflowering Catholic schoolgirls (Only the Good Die Young), written with a Gershwin flavor that recalls Tin Pan Alley. Continue Reading »

Filed Under: Articles | Arts & Leisure

September 3rd, 2008

RUMORS & LIES: FAIR AND BALANCED IN THE HAMPTONS.

by Jack Torrance

As repressed sadists are supposed to become policemen or butchers so those with irrational fear of life become publishers.
–Cyril Connolly (1903-1974)

Westhampton Beach had its Village elections this past June and more attention was paid to the fact that the local synagogue wanted to construct an Eruv than any issues having to do with local governance. The Eruv, which outlines a path with pieces of black PVC piping on telephone poles, got everyone’s juices flowing. In addition to the public face of support by the Mayor, who is also the former Police Chief of Westhampton Beach, the Village Board had to give a good show to the press. In reality, racism and anti-Semitism run deep in the Hamptons and the election spawned spontaneous groups such as a “non-profit” organization that suddenly erupted out of nowhere; it sent mailings to every voter supporting the “Separation of Church and State”and apparently was organized to exist only long enough to get Teller reelected. While Teller is known among his friends to be anti-Semitic, anti-New Yorker, and against change of any sort, the fact that he is an aging cop who controls the police force through intimidation and threats of removal is not lost on those around him. Many local businesses are holding on by a thread and most are forced to close in the winter for lack of customers. Why? No support from local government. Continue Reading »

Filed Under: Articles | Commentary | Politics | the Hamptons

September 3rd, 2008

KATE O’DONOVAN COOK EXHIBITS HER TRUE IDENTITY—ALL OF THEM.

by Joelle Panisch

Kate O’Donovan Cook is a classically trained artist with a flair for photography. Her collection showcases this pairing with a roundabout creativity that manipulates perspective, identity, and ultimately truth. Her works are plainly narrative but the stories they evoke are a little more complex. She often photographs herself as several characters in a single image. This cultivates a strangeness; a fantastic realm in what would otherwise be an obvious story.

O’Donovan Cook’s work is exceptional and stands out amongst the theatrical, fashionable photography spreads of today’s vogue. Her work is evocative and not to be missed.

Kate O’Donovan Cook
9/4-10/7
Stephen Haller Gallery
542 West 26th St. (between 10th and 11th Avenues)
New York, NY 10001
(212) 741 7777
Tuesday-Saturday
10am-6pm

Filed Under: Arts & Leisure | Events | New York

September 3rd, 2008

CURMUDGEON’S CORNER: BROUGHT TO YOU BY THE LETTER “D”.

by Sean Jaeger

Batten down the hatches, board up the windows, belt your butt to the mast.

It’s a perfect storm, an economic nor’easter, and like the actress said to the bishop, “Hang on. It’s going to be a bumpy ride.”

Some of the top economists in the country say this sucker of a storm isn’t going to blow over any time soon. In fact we are looking at years of low to negative growth. Some are not talking recession anymore. They are whispering warnings about the big “D” word. That’s D for depression, D for desperate times, D for drowning in debt, D for do you remember 1929? Continue Reading »

Filed Under: Articles | Commentary | Politics | the Hamptons

September 2nd, 2008

A DIFFERENT KIND OF EIGHTIES REVIVAL: REM & THE CURE.

by John Coakley

REM and the Cure are both closing in on the 30 year mark of making records. They both ruled different corners of 80’s alternative music (College Radio and Gothic accordingly) and they both hated to stay in those corners, though everyone from record company executives to their most ardent fans wanted them to do so. REM and the Cure are both still making music, and they are both still giving the people what they want when it comes to live shows.

REM
6/19/8
Madison Square Garden

The National opened the show with a set that was both passionate and lush, making me think that maybe their album Boxer wasn’t so overrated after all. Then again, their best song tonight was Mr. November (dedicated to Barack Obama), which was from an earlier album, so maybe it was. Modest Mouse looked promising at first since not many bands employ two drummers these days, and no other band has Johnny Marr of The Smiths playing with them. But whatever subtleties Marr added were lost in the Garden, and the songs weren’t dynamic enough to avoid getting lost themselves. Which is a pity, since Modest Mouse has some amazing tunes in their catalog. They also have a reputation for being either amazing or pathetic live; tonight they were just kind of ‘eh.’

Then after a 15 minute wait (amazing how the big shows run on schedule!) REM took the stage with Living Well Is the Best Revenge, the first song from their current album, Accelerate. Damn, they’re good. Continue Reading »

Filed Under: Articles | Arts & Leisure | New York

September 2nd, 2008

THE INTERVIEW NOBODY WANTED…BUT US. THE SOHO GABDABOUT CONFRONTS THE NAKED COWBOY!

by Anthony Venditto

“HOMOPHOBES SAY I’M QUEER, BUT I LIKE CHICKS AND BEER”
-The Naked Cowboy

The Naked Cowboy: He’s clad in plum smugglin’ man panties, rubs his bulbous yogurt cannon on children and the elderly and will unabashedly tweak your Mother’s sweater kittens while singing about wanting to screw your girlfriend right in front of your face. The sick part is people lap it up with shit-eating grins on their slack-jawed faces the entire time. It’s a testament to his performance that even though he’s nearly nude, he’s about as sexually threatening as Bill Cosby from the second season of the Cosby Show—you know, before all those “alleged” date rape accusations.

Like it or lump it, the Naked Cowboy is as ubiquitous a symbol of our city as his stomping grounds, Times Square. Just like Times Square itself, locals loathe him and tourists love him. Lucky me; I get to walk by him on the daily as he performs right between my workplace and the gentleman’s club, Lace (which gloriously offers no cover charge and half-priced drinks Monday through Friday in the afternoons).

Hammered nicely one day, I stopped for a couple of minutes to actually watch the dude. Naturally I became intrigued as he posed, preened and sang while women of all ages and ethnicities squealed and lined up to get groped and take pictures with him at $2 a pop. The next day I looked up his number and set up a time to interview him. It would become one of the most wickedly surreal experiences of my life and I share it now with you, dear readers. Continue Reading »

Filed Under: Articles | Arts & Leisure | Community | New York

September 1st, 2008

PURE GOLD: THEOCRACY HAS NO PLACE IN THE WHITE HOUSE.

by Ed Gold


Pro-life, creationist, anti-science, and potentially one heart attack away from the presidency.

The religious right’s intrusion into American politics gets scarier with each election.

Now we have a pretty face from Alaska, who once supported Pat Buchanan for the presidency, who could possibly be one breath away from the Oval Office, telling us abortion is unacceptable even after incest and rape; creationism should be added to the science curriculum; and that humans have nothing to do with global warming (maybe because she couldn’t find “global warming” in the bible).

Sarah Palin is John McCain’s gift to the religious right. McCain, who on occasion calls us a “Christian nation,” can be counted on to bury Roe vs. Wade should he prevail in November.

It should be mentioned that Palin’s pitch for the Hillary vote is an insult to women. As Gail Collins says in the N.Y. Times: “The idea that women are going to race off and vote for any candidate with the same internal plumbing is both offensive and historically wrong.”

A few years ago, Chris Shays, the Republican congressman from Connecticut, put the issue in more frightening terms: Continue Reading »

Filed Under: Articles | Commentary | New York | Politics

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