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July 6th, 2005

The Restless Miscreant: The Emperor’s New Army

by Delbert Grady

So what’s the story, Jerry? Well, of the 135,000 or so Army and Marine troops in Iraq and Kuwait, almost 60,000 are reservists or National Guard. You know who they are-the guys and gals down the block just trying to make a living and get away from their spouses once a month and a couple of weeks a year. Unfortunately for them, they never figured on Bush (after all, no one ever expects the Spanish Inquisition). Shanghaied off the streets, they found that perhaps they should have paid more attention to the fine print. Who knows, maybe it was just another cynical Rove plot to help job statistics by removing potential additions to the unemployment lines due to outsourcing. Let’s face it, Machiavelli is never far away with this administration.
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Filed Under: Articles | Politics | the Hamptons

July 6th, 2005

Box-Busters

by Kathryn Szoka

Box-Busters is a group of local merchants, community groups, and concerned citizens joining forces to encourage Southampton Town officials to support local businesses and the town’s superstore legislation. Box-Busters are currently focused on proposed plans for a superstore in Bridgehampton. Barnes & Noble wants to build on property that does not permit a bookstore in the current zoning. Town officials claim the national chain is threatening to sue the town if it doesn’t let them build a 27,000sf superstore.
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Filed Under: Articles | Politics | the Hamptons

July 6th, 2005

Book Review: The Art of Photographing Children

by Terry Lucas

If you have children, you probably have shoeboxes full of photographs. If you are like me, many of those photographs either show children posing stiffly in front of beautiful scenes or are so blurry that you cannot tell which image is your child and which is the cat. A new book is here to help us: The Art of Photographing Children by Cheryl Machat Dorskind published by Watson-Gupthill Publications.
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Filed Under: Articles | Arts & Leisure | the Hamptons

July 6th, 2005

Rumors and Lies…Fair & Unbalanced in The Hamptons

by Jack Torrence

We?Ǭ have been roundly criticized for conveying the sense that Dockers, a bayside restaurant in the Hamptons (East Quogue) is anything but an environmentally sound beautification project that is good for our waterways. More yachts emptying their chemical toilets into Shinnecock Bay has always seemed attractive to us. The Southampton Press, in fact, saw fit to give Larry Hoffman (the owner of Dockers’s and operator of the Inn at Quogue (not the owner) his own column in their newspaper. Belatedly, we were all given a lecture as to how environmentally sensitive he is and that the project is really good for us all (and especially good for all of those other Dune Road commercial property owners waiting in the bushes for Dockers to get an approval so they can sue for permits to do the same thing). Won’t that make a dip in the Bay a religious experience, with chemical vapors and feces to hold on to?
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Filed Under: Articles | Politics | the Hamptons

July 6th, 2005

Hamptons Politics: Inside-Outside in Suffolk County

by D. Clark MacPherson

If there were an identifiable trend in Hamptons politics it would most likely be the drift away from the two party agenda. In Nassau County, Tom Suozzi has become famous for his “Fix Albany” campaign, in which he takes aim at the leadership in the Assembly and Senate. In Suozzi’s case, there is a two party system-he still enjoys support from Republicans, as well as his own Democrats. In Suffolk County and in the Hamptons, the true Democratic Party has become an endangered species co-opted by the Democratic County leadership. Cross-endorsements have become the price of this second-class status. County Democrats supporting Republicans as a growing trend, which maintains a few candidates and saves the Republicans campaign money-in exchange for diminishing roles in almost every race.
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Filed Under: Articles | Politics | the Hamptons

July 6th, 2005

Community Group Promises to Fight Demolition of Historic Building

by SoHo Journal Staff

GVSHP

The Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation (GVSHP) has?Ǭ learned from monitoring the Department of Buildings (DOB) website that plans were filed to construct a 20-story, 225 ft. tall building at 70 Bethune Street/469 West Street, which would be the tallest building along the Greenwich Village waterfront.?Ǭ GVSHP has been monitoring building applications on the site for some time, aware that Related Companies has planned to build a residential development on this site.
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Filed Under: Articles | New York | Politics

July 6th, 2005

Community Focus: Interview with Melinda Katz

by D. Clark MacPherson

It is rare for a member of the City Council to take time out and meet with someone that is not part of his or her constituency. But Melinda Katz took the time to talk with us about SoHo as well as the initiatives that she hopes will work for the entire city, including all 5 boroughs, as well as her own district in Queens. And, clearly, she is a supporter of the efforts we have expended in SoHo to curb developments that threaten our community. In our discussions she was also interested and concerned with preserving our Arts heritage, the problems with obliterating illegal billboards, our dangerous traffic problems, and the oversaturation of bars.
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Filed Under: Articles | Interview | New York | Politics

July 6th, 2005

Bob Bolles MIA-No More!

by D. Clark MacPherson

One of the most vexing problems in SoHo has been public art preservation. While many business people and developers use the art card in advertising our community for their products, little more than lip service is given to the hard work and expense of doing something about it. Virtually no money has been donated locally by developers or the City to support efforts to protect local public art. The sculptures of original SoHo artist Bob Bolles which were implanted in the triangle at Broome, Watts and West Broadway in the 1960’s and thereafter known as “Guerilla Art,” is a case in point. There was a lot of spontaneous public art in the 1950’s and 1960’s, before developers gave any thought to investing in the paper warehouses and printing lofts that predated what we now know as SoHo.?Ǭ About 3 years ago, these sculptures that our colorful friend Bob Bolles lovingly crafted and implanted in the little triangle that borders the Holland Tunnel entrance traffic were unceremoniously ripped up by the Parks Department, tossed into dumpsters and carted away to Randall’s Island. Henry Stern, former Parks Commissioner and occasional contributor to this magazine (who is a savvy politician and crafty writer), once describe the sculptures as “junk.” A lot of people felt that way, and many still do. But, that has never been the point. These imposing iron sculptures have always been synonymous with the artistic heritage and the Wild West arts-settler mentality that created SoHo. While the Bolles sculptures may be junk, it’s our original junk. The park that now exists in the place where the sculptures lived is fine for what it is. It is a vest park where one can sit and eat a sandwich while inhaling exhaust fumes from the Holland Tunnel entrance lane-staring at illegal billboards at 15 Watts Street (where Lola wants to open a cabaret) and 366 West Broadway/505 Broome Street where owners pull in $15,000 monthly (per sign) from Van Wagoner Communications at our quality of life expense-and complete with homeless men sleeping on the benches. A relaxing, quiet, bucolic public resting spot, it is not.?Ǭ But now, at least, a little bit of Art History has been made-three of the Bob Bolles sculptures have been returned. Adrian Benepe, the Parks Commissioner and William Castro, the Manhattan Borough Parks Commissioner, have honored the spirit of the Community Board resolution which allowed the sculptures to be removed and the park to be built. While it is often hard to work with a large bureaucracy, both Commissioners Benepe and Castro got this done by getting personally involved. And the residents of SoHo, the original and more politically involved people of SoHo, appreciate it.?Ǭ Attorney-activist Larry Goldberg, a Community Board #2 member, made numerous attempts to negotiate a settlement on behalf of the SoHo Arts Council, Inc., a downtown non-profit activist arts organization, and it finally paid off. The SoHo Alliance and Sean Sweeney have also helped to keep the issue alive.?Ǭ On the morning of November 11th at 9:00 a.m., three trucks rolled up to Sunflower Park (as Bolles Park is officially known)?Ǭ and 5 Parks employees began re-installing 3 of the original pieces that were taken away years ago. The center piece sculpture was installed by 3 men-one of which was a veteran- the scene?Ǭ vaguely reminiscent of the flag being raised at Iwo Jima. It was as close to a religious experience as one can imagine if you personally knew Bob. The only other “official” watching this event was the Mayor of SoHo, Jay Schwimmer and his dog Honey.?Ǭ It is hoped that we can work with the Parks Department to bring back one or two more sculptures, construct a more attractive fence for the center mound after the installation is made more permanent, and have a formal ceremony to rename Bob Bolles Park.?Ǭ But, at least the first step has been accomplished.

Filed Under: Articles | Arts & Leisure | New York

July 6th, 2005

Hurricane Environmental Damage “Almost Unimaginable”

by SoHo Journal Staff

Enviroment News Service Editor

BATON ROUGE, Louisiana, September 7, 2005 (ENS) -?Ǭ Hurricane Katrina has left Louisiana with environmental wreckage that is “almost unimaginable,” the head of the state Department of Environmental Quality said on Tuesday.
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Filed Under: Articles | New York | Politics

July 6th, 2005

Art: Arena Studios Showcases the Female Form

by Violet Bennett

Arena Studios has long been a force to be reckoned with in NYC nightlife. While continuing to promote some of the hottest and most anticipated events, over the last year they have focused that dynamic energy toward their SoHo gallery space. The artists Arena has chosen to work with create some of the sexiest fine art on the scene today. Last fall they showcased a retrospective of D. Clark MacPherson’s SoHo Nudes: 1969-2004. Working exclusively in black and white photography with inexperienced models, MacPherson’s shots are daring, revealing and intimate. He originally conceived the series as “Natural Nudes” and rather than commanding poses, he allows his models to freely express themselves. The results range from modest to deeply seductive.
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Filed Under: Articles | Arts & Leisure | New York

July 6th, 2005

Drag Queens Do It Better! Night of a Thousand Gowns Charity Ball

by C.B. Coakley

On Saturday, April 2, 2005 the Broadway Ballroom of the New York Marriott Marquis was host to dazzling jewels, gowns and especially personalities! The dress for Night of a Thousand Gowns Charity Ball and Coronation is always formal, black tie or dress uniform, however the uninitiated would be unprepared for just how impressive the attire can be.
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Filed Under: Articles | Arts & Leisure | New York

July 6th, 2005

The Spirit of Black Theatre: The New Federal Theater’s 35th Anniversary Gala

by John Wegorzewski and Edward Callaghan

The invitation to Woodie King Jr.’s?Ǭ New Federal Theater’s 35th Anniversary Gala urged “Catch The Spirit of Black Theater,” and the over 800 supporters who packed New York’s historic Town Hall caught it indeed.
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Filed Under: Articles | Arts & Leisure | New York

July 6th, 2005

UPTOWN-DOWNTOWN

by Alexandra Schwimmer

Uptown is coming back downtown. This move has been clear for quite some time to belongers walking west from the cobblestoned streets of Mercer and Greene towards West Broadway, the only two way street in SoHo. Neighborhood businesses reflect most clearly where the economic support of our area comes from. SoHo invariably thrives on outside support and tourists are a fact of life. I have grown with my neighborhood and am one of the few who can truthfully say they have been a part of SoHo street life from birth. As I grew up I witnessed the openings of such national stores as Ralph Lauren, Dolce and Gabanna, Armani, and Burberry. Belongers, as I refer to people of my neighborhood, are surrounded by businesses mostly marketed towards out of towners. These businesses cater to an uptown and out of town clientele and local residents are unfortunately not depended upon or encouraged to enter. As one of the city’s hottest markets for new retailing, SoHo was devastated by September 11th and it has taken almost four years to make its way back. This renewal is arriving in the form of uptown moving back downtown. SoHo’s recent history can be felt most clearly when heading south on West Broadway. The glare of the sun causes a common squint. There is now direct sunlight that would not have been experienced four years ago on this same strip. The Towers, our skyscraper sunblockers, are gone and with them went economic stability for neighborhood businesses. Only very recently has new money found its way back downtown.

Broome Street Bar’s double set of doors open directly onto Broome Street facing the mad tunnel traffic. The length of the late Nineteenth Century saloon runs down West Broadway, dominating the entire corner. It was in here that I overheard locals discussing the return of uptown. “It’s like a mall now. It used to be all special nice little stores and now it’s just like everywhere else.” The conversation is going on between two women seated along the wall of windows that look out onto West Broadway where an ice sculpture of a lion stands guard. The lion has been carved by a local artist out of a three foot high frozen?Ǭ snow drift. The wall of glass is offset by rectangles of blackboard with chalk drawings and artwork on them. Some list desert menus but even these have creative designs hand drawn among the cursive letters. The artwork changes infrequently, just like the clientele. “When I walk around I feel like I’m uptown,” agrees the second woman. A man seated next to be at the bar breaks in, “It’s just the neighborhood changing, besides it’s ours after dark anyway.” The first speaker pauses while balancing a soup spoon, “It’s not how it used to be,” she concludes decisively.
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Filed Under: Articles | Arts & Leisure | New York

July 6th, 2005

An Evening at the SoHo Grand

by Sareena Sandhu

SoHo Grand
310 West Broadway
between Canal St. & Grand St
212-965-3000

In the heart of SoHo and walking distance to great restaurants, cafes, and shopping rests the SoHo Grand Hotel. Recently, I frequented their Saturday night to checkout the crowd and ambiance. The d?cor of the bar was equivalent to that of a spacious living room with roomy couches, soft lighting, and appropriate music. While waiting for a drink at the well stocked bar, I spoke to a group visiting from the UK. Christopher and Ian were staying at the Soho Grand and just had come down for a cocktail. They spoke at length of the staff and rooms and their enjoyment of the hotel. This night was a bit of a mystery but already they had met a lot of people and were at home in this fixture.
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Filed Under: Articles | Arts & Leisure | New York

July 6th, 2005

Nightlife Music: Tombstone Brawlers and Spitfire America

by J.J. Connelly

Tombstone Brawlers

The first time I saw the Tombstone Brawlers was at New York Decay’s annual Drop Dead Festival at The Knitting Factory. Originally, I was a little disappointed with the lineup at the Drop Dead Fest. One of my favorite “Horror Rock” bands had been excluded and I was thinking of skipping it altogether. By the same token, Alex and Polina have always been really nice to me, and they always give a portion of the proceeds to charity. Between that, and the fact that you just don’t get gatherings like the Drop Dead Festival in SoHo very often, I decided to at least show my face. I was glad I did.
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Filed Under: Articles | Arts & Leisure | New York

July 6th, 2005

The Goal of the Politician: Climbing the Slippery Slope and Keeping Off the Rest

by Henry Stern

The world of politics is the world of pretense. This is true for a number of reasons. One is that it attracts people with large egos and urgent desires for recognition and acceptance. Being physically attractive is helpful but not a requirement (Rule 32-P: Politics is Hollywood for ugly people). Intelligence is helpful, but shrewdness is a greater asset. Candidates twist themselves into knots to make a favorable impression. Which reminds me:
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Filed Under: Articles | New York | Politics

July 6th, 2005

Women Get Naughty: Talking Dirt in Hollywood

by Kate Rigg

When the comics hit the stage in The Naughty Show, there is no doubt that wild women DO (make you laugh!) Conceived by former adult film director turned crossover indie producer Skye Blue, movie star and comedienne Lisa Ann Walter (Shall We Dance? Bruce Almighty, The Parent Trap) and New York comedy diva Kate Rigg (Chink-O-Rama, Family Guy), The Naughty Show provides a platform for comediennes to venture into territory usually reserved for the guys: sexually explicit material, edgy political rants, lewd jokes, and outspoken points of view. Premiered at the Ivar Theater in Hollywood last December with a team of top comics from New York and L.A, The Naughty Show brought out couples on dates, girls’ night outers, artists and hipsters for a night of no-holds-barred, girl-powered laughs.
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Filed Under: Articles | Arts & Leisure | New York

July 6th, 2005

Fashion: Summer 2005, Vintage Glamour with Edgy Design

by Sareena Sandhu

In a time where accessories are entering a new spirit of innovation arrives Steel Couture’s new line of jewelry and accessories. I sat down with designer Lisa Fortin to take stock?Ǭ?Ǭ of her evolving line of jewelry, belts, and other accessories. Lisa is dressed today in a turquoise man’s tank with torn and faded jeans and beat-up Converse sneakers. She has on a very rich looking vintage neck piece that she has pegged the Gracie necklace. It is made of candy jade connected by a vintage brass chain.
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Filed Under: Articles | Arts & Leisure | New York

July 6th, 2005

Gothkill, a nightmare in progress

by John Coakley

When I first spoke with JJ Connelly last May, “Gothkill,” his first feature length film, was still in the planning stages. Now, filming is almost done, post-production should commence this summer, and screenings will hopefully be given this summer. Along the way there have been financial setbacks, visions lost and regained, and a lot of fake blood and gasoline light. Writer-director Connelly, actor-pyrotechnician Flambeaux, make-up artist-actor Tom “The Misfit” Velez, and assistant director-actor Anastasia Andino all spilled their guts to me on a chilly Sunday in March.
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Filed Under: Articles | Arts & Leisure | New York

July 6th, 2005

NY in the 70’s: On display at Tribute through 7-10-05

by SoHo Journal Staff

Tribute, the museum and art space located in the land marked Standard Oil Building just south of the World Trade Center site in lower Manhattan has created a total 1970s immersion exhibit which opened on March 10th. The entire museum?Ǭ flashes visitors back to the era of pop art, hedonism, political cynicism, etc. as it brings Award-winning photographer Allan Tannenbaum’s book “New York in the 70s” to life. Tribute showcases hundreds of Tannenbaum’s photos which examine the fashion, music, politics, theater, pop culture and more via various video screens, displays, prints, exhibits and art. Special events featuring celebrity guests, book/CD signings and the chance to watch segments being filmed for a 6 part documentary on the 70s also take place during the 3 month exhibit.
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Filed Under: Articles | Arts & Leisure | New York

July 6th, 2005

SoHo Redux: NY in the 70’s: The Work of Photographer Allan Tannenbaum

by D. Clark MacPherson

It was like meeting someone at a high school reunion, except that we had never met. The parallel lives we spent in SoHo during the 60’s and 70’s were brought together by Allan Tannenbaum’s book of photographs lying between our coffee mugs at the Cupping Room Caf?  right in the midst of where it all had happened. There were photos of West Broadway in a snowstorm with little to tell the viewer that just around that particular corner lived an artist named Lois, who would hang from the third floor of her illegal loft on Broome Street where she painted wild 8 foot canvasses and screamed at her landlord. A few blocks away were the Bob Bolles sculptures that the artist implanted in the asphalt as he did odd jobs at the Broome Street Bar and McSorley’s. Bolles earring and bandana were his trademark,s along with some heavy lifting (both iron and his mug.) Artists carry their paintings along Prince Street on the way to an impromptu installation, among the photos, demonstrators carry anti-war placards in the streets, and “happenings” are captured in lofts where SoHo’s insiders paint the bodies of their nude models who are eager to be installed in avante garde immortality.
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Filed Under: Articles | Arts & Leisure | New York

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